The First UHA Virtual Roundtable – “Police Violence in the United States: How Did We Get Here?” – Is In The Books!

Last night The Metropole‘s Disciplining the City editors Matthew Guariglia and Charlotte Rosen (click those links to read their most recent work) moderated a panel on “Police Violence in the United States: How Did We Get Here?” It was the first in a series of three virtual discussions between experts of the carceral state convened by the Urban History Association. Historians Ashley Howard, Simon Balto, Toussaint Losier, and Anne Gray Fischer dug into the subject and delivered numerous insights on the history and present state of policing in America. A few examples to whet your appetite:

 

And there was so much more! If you couldn’t make it, fear not: the panel is archived and accessible to the public on the Urban History Association’s Youtube channel.

Also, don’t forget that next week, on Tuesday, July 7 at 8pm, is the second panel in the series – “Urban Uprisings Against Racist Police Terror in Context” – featuring historians Heather Ann Thompson, Austin McCoy, Max Felker-Kantor, and Carl Suddler. It will be hosted and moderated once again by our Disciplining the City editors, and carceral state experts themselves, Matthew Guariglia and Charlotte Rosen.

The Metropole


Featured image (at top): African American demonstrators outside the White House, with signs “We demand the right to vote, everywhere” and signs protesting police brutality against civil rights demonstrators in Selma, Alabama, Warren K. Leffler, March 12, 1965, Prints and Photographs Division Library of Congress.

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