Beacons of Truth: Newspaper Buildings in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries

This piece by Lily Corral is the sixth and final entrant into the Third Annual UHA/The Metropole Graduate Student Blogging Contest. Corral takes on the life cycle of the media industry, and shows how the architecture built by newspapers reflects the industry’s birth, heyday, and now legacy. Daily news comes to us in all forms. […]

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Member of the Week: Charlotte Rosen

Charlotte Rosen PhD Candidate in History Northwestern University  @CharlotteERosen Describe your current research. What about it drew your interest? I just became ABD five seconds ago, and so I still feel kind of silly describing my current research since I know its bound to change, but: in the broadest sense, I am researching mass incarceration […]

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All Stick No Carrot: Racism, Property Tax Assessments, and Neoliberalism Post 1945 Chicago

Our focus on the new edited volume, Shaped by the State: Toward a New Political History of the Twentieth Century continues as we discuss race and property tax assessments with University of Virginia historian, Andrew Kahrl who contributed the essay, “The Short Ends of Both Sticks: Property Assessments and Black Taxpayer Disadvantage in Urban America.” […]

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The briefest of guides to #AHA19

Growing up in and around Chicago in the 1980s and 1990s, one witnessed the city’s incomplete political transformation. Mayor Harold Washington’s 1983 victory propelled him to City Hall where during his brief but impactful tenure he began dismantling the Democratic machine built under Anton Cermak during the 1930s and consolidated by Richard J. Daley in […]

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Member of the Week: LaDale Winling

LaDale Winling Associate Professor, Department of History Virginia Tech @lwinling Describe your current research. What about it drew your interest? I am currently researching real estate and segregation in Chicago in the 1920s and 1930s. From this milieu, in the midst of the Great Migration and in wake of the 1919 race riot, emerged new […]

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Member of the Week: René Luís Alvarez

René Luís Alvarez, PhD Lecturer in History Arrupe College of Loyola University Chicago   Describe your current research. What about it drew your interest?  I have researched and written about the history of American urban education, focusing mainly on Chicago’s Mexican American community. While the teaching and administrative responsibilities of my current position at Arrupe […]

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Member of the Week: Betsy Schlabach

Betsy Schlabach Associate Professor of History and African & African American Studies Earlham College @schlabetsy Describe your current research. What about it drew your interest?  My current book traces African-American women’s use of policy gambling to navigate racism, sexism, and capitalism in Black Chicago between 1890-1960. Policy structured economic and gender relations there, where participation […]

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Member of the Week: Elizabeth Todd-Breland

Elizabeth Todd-Breland Assistant Professor University of Illinois at Chicago @EToddBreland Describe your current research. What about it drew your interest?  I am currently finishing a book about transformations in Black politics, shifts in modes of education organizing, and the racial politics of education reform in Chicago from the 1960s to the present. I’ve always been […]

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Member of the Week: Joanna Merwood-Salisbury

Prof. Joanna Merwood-Salisbury Faculty of Architecture and Design Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand Describe your current research. What about it drew your interest?  I began my career as an historian of late-nineteenth-century American architecture, in particular the culture of the early Chicago skyscraper (roughly 1880 to 1910). My research investigated the broader group of […]

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The Chrysler Village History Project: Public History and Community-Building on Chicago’s Southwest Side

This is the inaugural post in a series highlighting urban and suburban public history projects. The Chrysler Village History Project has its origins in the spring semester of 2013, when a group of history graduate students from Loyola University Chicago nominated the Chrysler Village neighborhood on Chicago’s southwest side to the National Register of Historic […]

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