Category Archives: ICYMI

ICYMI: The “How is it almost October?” Edition

By Avigail Oren

A reminder that Sunday is the last day for early-bird registration for the SACRPH Conference! Save yourself $20 and spend it on one of the amazing historical tours of Cleveland that will take place on the Sunday after the conference.

It’s also last call to submit an abstract for the a 2018-19 symposium sponsored by New York University and the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies at Southern Methodist University on the Histories of Indigenous Urbanism.

Our former #MotW Katherine Zubovich has a new post on urban renewal and displacement in Soviet Moscow up on our internet-bff’s blog, Global Urban History.

Marisol Lebrón’s article on policing, colonialism, and Puerto Rico is currently open-access for a short time on NACLA.

LitHub on Belt, the magazine and press that are pushing back against the ruin/revival/renaissance narratives of cities like Pittsburgh, Cleveland, and Detroit.

This is a real throwback, but I missed it in July when it ran in the New Yorker. Nathan Heller offers a great overview of corpus linguistics and the digital humanities in his examination of research that has been done on a corpus of emails from the Enron Corporation. As an editor, I particularly loved this passage:

Writing, along with fire-making and the invention of the wheel, is widely held to be a milestone of human progress. This view will seem naïve to anybody who has read much human writing. In its feral form, prose is unhinged, mystifying, and repetitive. Writers feel moved to “get things down on paper,” usually incoherently, and even in guarded moods say alarming stuff because they don’t know where to put their commas. (“Time to eat children!”) The true wellspring of civilization isn’t writing; it is editing.

And, of course, the money line and a truism of which I am so, so guilty:

(Who among us has not stood atop millennia of human language and, after a moment of reflection, signed an e-mail “Best”?)

And why not conclude with some who really nailed it with his correspondence?

 

Until next week!

ICYMI: The 2018 UHA Conference CFP Edition

By Avigail Oren

We can’t imagine that our loyal readers have missed the exciting news–the Call for Papers for the 2018 UHA Biennial Conference in Columbia, South Carolina dropped on Wednesday. The deadline is not until February, so you have plenty of time to pull together panels and write your proposal. In the meantime, however…

Take a look at the amazing program for the upcoming SACRPH conference. I was perusing it the other day and realized that not only are some of my favorite academic colleagues presenting, but so is one of my best friends from college!

Also check out the EAUH’s CFP for the 14th International Conference on Urban History and the CFA for the OAH’s China Residencies Program, both due in October.

While we’re thinking globally, Joseph Ben Prestel has a new post on “Cairo, Berlin, and the Compartments of Urban History” up at the Global Urban History blog.

I recommend this interview with Anthony Bourdain, about an upcoming episode of his show Parts Unknown that was filmed in Pittsburgh, for Bourdain’s criticism of the war on drugs, mass incarceration, and the racialization of the opioid epidemic. Also, because Pittsburgh is great.

The correct response to this stupid Bodega startup is:

a) I can’t even

b) Eyeroll emoji

c) Screaming into the void

d) All of the above

And signing off with one of my favorite internet personalities, Lego Grad Student. Have a great weekend!

 

ICYMI: The Long Look Back Edition

We missed sharing a lot of great history-related stuff with you, our dear readers, during our August hiatus. Have no fear, a great round-up is here!

Over at the Global Urban History Project‘s blog–our internet bffs–Noam Maggor wrote about “Brahmin Boston and the Politics of Interconnectedness” and Razak Khan about “Princely Architectural Cosmopolitanism and Urbanity in Rampur.”

UHA member Brent Cebul explained the perverse incentives of property tax policy over on City Lab.

From the UCLA Department of Chicanx Studies, a cool map of important Latinx sites in suburban Los Angeles.

The Washington Post’s Made By History vertical recently featured UHA members Andrew Kahrl, Max Felker-Kantor, Dan Berger, Brian Purnell and Jeanne Theoharis, Adam Goodman, Andy Horowitz, Victoria Wolcott, N.D. B. Connolly, and, just today, Heather Ann Thompson.

Following Charlottesville, UHA member Walter Greason’s tweet thread on teaching collective racial violence went viral… we’ll have a reflection from him about the experience on The Metropole next week!

 

I enjoyed the premier episode of Christine Morgan’s new YouTube series The History Gal, and look forward to seeing how the show evolves.

For those who love music as much as they love urban history, I found a Spotify playlist called “Metropolis” for you to jam to this weekend.

And last but not least, a shout-out to us all from the inimitable Ta-Nehisi Coates:

 

Have a great weekend!

Avigail, Ryan, and Hope

Friday’s ICYMI

It’s been a big week for history (and counterfactual history) in the media and around the web!

Matt Guariglia, the editor of The Metropole‘s Disciplining the City series, published an historical look at surveillance data collection in the Washington Post’s new Made By History vertical. A notable anti-surveillance advocate re-tweeted.

The Global Urban History blog featured a conversation with UHA member Nancy Kwak on the increasingly intertwining fields of urban and global history.

Mae Ngai in the New York Times on the cruel history of how U.S. immigration law has manipulated the definitions of family.

Keisha N. Blain and Ibram X. Kendi argue in History News Network that we should all be writing for a broader public.

The dates have been released for this year’s Chicago Urban History Seminar.

And for those of you who need a little pick-me-up:

Friday’s ICYMI Roundup

This week on The Metropole, we traveled from prisons in Paris to Buenos Aires and Brazil,  then northwest to Gay Seattle and back eastwards to the Chrysler Village neighborhood of Chicago. We hope you enjoyed reading about poisoners and policing in seventeenth century France, the uniquely local form of LGBTQ activism that developed in twentieth-century Seattle, the award-winning efforts of public historians to engage local residents to explore a neighborhood’s history, and meeting our Member of the Week, Claudio Daflon. Join us next week for the beginning of a multi-part exploration of Seattle in pop-culture!

And in case you missed these urban history items around the web this week:

UHA Board Member Todd Michney in BELT Magazine on what the history of one Cleveland neighborhood can tell us about race and housing inequality.

In Next City, American University Professor Derek Hyra writes on “Black branding” Washington D.C’s Shaw/U Street neighborhood to white millennials

As a part of KCET’s Lost LA series, Laura Dominguez describes the 1967 protest at the Black Cat bar in Los Angeles, which occurred two years before Stonewall.

And let’s end with a timely history joke: