Category Archives: ICYMI

Friday’s ICYMI

It’s been a big week for history (and counterfactual history) in the media and around the web!

Matt Guariglia, the editor of The Metropole‘s Disciplining the City series, published an historical look at surveillance data collection in the Washington Post’s new Made By History vertical. A notable anti-surveillance advocate re-tweeted.

The Global Urban History blog featured a conversation with UHA member Nancy Kwak on the increasingly intertwining fields of urban and global history.

Mae Ngai in the New York Times on the cruel history of how U.S. immigration law has manipulated the definitions of family.

Keisha N. Blain and Ibram X. Kendi argue in History News Network that we should all be writing for a broader public.

The dates have been released for this year’s Chicago Urban History Seminar.

And for those of you who need a little pick-me-up:

Friday’s ICYMI Roundup

This week on The Metropole, we traveled from prisons in Paris to Buenos Aires and Brazil,  then northwest to Gay Seattle and back eastwards to the Chrysler Village neighborhood of Chicago. We hope you enjoyed reading about poisoners and policing in seventeenth century France, the uniquely local form of LGBTQ activism that developed in twentieth-century Seattle, the award-winning efforts of public historians to engage local residents to explore a neighborhood’s history, and meeting our Member of the Week, Claudio Daflon. Join us next week for the beginning of a multi-part exploration of Seattle in pop-culture!

And in case you missed these urban history items around the web this week:

UHA Board Member Todd Michney in BELT Magazine on what the history of one Cleveland neighborhood can tell us about race and housing inequality.

In Next City, American University Professor Derek Hyra writes on “Black branding” Washington D.C’s Shaw/U Street neighborhood to white millennials

As a part of KCET’s Lost LA series, Laura Dominguez describes the 1967 protest at the Black Cat bar in Los Angeles, which occurred two years before Stonewall.

And let’s end with a timely history joke: