The Way Concrete Goes

In this, our third entrant into the Third Annual UHA/The Metropole Graduate Student Blogging Contest, Vyta Baselice takes us through the life cycle of concrete. To understand how this construction material moves from birth to death, Baselice has us travel from Pennsylvania in the late nineteenth century to mid-twentieth century New York City, before boomeranging […]

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Funding the World of Tomorrow: Public-Private Partnerships and the 1939 World’s Fair

This piece by Katie Uva is the first entrant into the Third Annual UHA/The Metropole Graduate Student Blogging Contest. We invited graduate students to submit essays on “the birth, death, or aging of institutions, neighborhoods, cities, or suburbs,” and Uva hones in on the life cycle of the New York World’s Fair to argue that […]

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Lagos: A Place with Open Eyes

By Lisa A. Lindsay A decade before the American Civil War, James Churchwill (“Church”) Vaughan set out to fulfill his formerly enslaved father’s dying wish: that he should leave his home in South Carolina for a new life in Africa. With help from the American Colonization Society, he went first to Liberia, though he did […]

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Member of the Week: Jessica Elfenbein

Jessica Elfenbein Professor of History University of South Carolina Describe your current research. What about it drew your interest?  I’m working on a community study of a now-disappeared place called Ferguson, SC. In the decades following Reconstruction, Chicago lumbermen Benjamin F. Ferguson (1840-1905) and Francis Beidler (1854-1924) made their way to South Carolina, acquired–at bargain […]

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Member of the Week: Kim Phillips-Fein

Kim Phillips-Fein Associate Professor Gallatin School of Individualized Study and History Department, College of Arts and Sciences New York University Describe your current research. What about it drew your interest? I’m actually between major research projects now, which is a nice though sometimes anxiety-provoking place to be!  I have been thinking about a lot of […]

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Member of the Week: Mason Williams

Mason Williams Assistant Professor of Leadership Studies and Political Science Williams College @masonbwilliams Describe your current research. What about it drew your interest?  I’m writing a book about how New York City rebuilt its public institutions in the wake of the 1975 Fiscal Crisis—looking especially at schools, policing, and public space. The era of New […]

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Member of the Week: Bridget Flannery-McCoy

Bridget Flannery-McCoy Editor in Economics and US History Columbia University Press @bridgetfmccoy Describe your current editorial projects. What about them are you finding interesting, challenging, and rewarding?  I always have projects at various stages: proposals going out for peer review, draft chapters coming in on books-in-progress, full manuscripts ready for line editing. No matter the […]

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Member of the Week: Andrew Konove

Andrew Konove Assistant Professor Department of History, University of Texas at San Antonio @AndrewKonove Describe your current research. What about it drew your interest?  I just completed my first book, Black Market Capital: Urban Politics and the Shadow Economy in Mexico City, which will be published later this spring. It traces the history of Mexico […]

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Member of the Week: Margaret O’Mara

Margaret O’Mara Professor of History University of Washington Describe your current research. What about it drew your interest? I’m currently working on a book about the history of the American high-tech industry—from semiconductors to social media—and its relationship to the worlds of politics and finance. My interest and intent here is, to adapt a phrase, […]

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