Cody High School: From Promise to Punishment

Our second entrant into the Third Annual UHA/The Metropole Graduate Student Blogging Contest is Matt Kautz, who takes us to a very particular high school in Detroit. The life cycle of this one institution, Kautz shows, offers a peek at the birth of the school-to-prison pipeline. Detroit’s desegregation case, Milliken v. Bradley, is largely remembered […]

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Member of the Week: Michael Glass

Michael Glass Ph.D. Candidate, Princeton University @m_r_glass Describe your current research. What about it drew your interest?  As a former New York City high school teacher, I’ve long been interested in educational inequality. For my M.A. thesis, I studied the 1950s school desegregation movement in Harlem, portions of which were recently published in the JUH. […]

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Digital Summer School: Harlem Education History Project

All good things must come to an end, and this is especially true of summer school. Whether talking about the 1980s Mark Harmon feature or the classroom, digital and analog, it’s come time to shutter our doors for a couple weeks as The Metropole takes some time off. We’ll re-open after Labor Day with a […]

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Member of the Week: René Luís Alvarez

René Luís Alvarez, PhD Lecturer in History Arrupe College of Loyola University Chicago   Describe your current research. What about it drew your interest?  I have researched and written about the history of American urban education, focusing mainly on Chicago’s Mexican American community. While the teaching and administrative responsibilities of my current position at Arrupe […]

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Member of the Week: Erika Kitzmiller

Erika M. Kitzmiller Teachers College Columbia University Describe your current research. What about it drew your interest?  My scholarship examines the historical processes and current reform efforts that have contributed to and challenged inequalities in present-day urban spaces. My work leverages quantitative and qualitative data to understand the intersections of educational policy and the lives […]

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The New York Times and the movement for integrated education in New York City

Our second entry in The Metropole/Urban History Association Graduate Student Blogging Contest explores the role of the New York Times in NYC school integration debates during the early 1960s through the lens the newspaper itself and the Pulitzer Prize winning work of Gene Roberts and Hank Klibanoff’s work, Race Beat: The Press, The Civil Rights Struggle, and […]

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Member of the Week: Elizabeth Todd-Breland

Elizabeth Todd-Breland Assistant Professor University of Illinois at Chicago @EToddBreland Describe your current research. What about it drew your interest?  I am currently finishing a book about transformations in Black politics, shifts in modes of education organizing, and the racial politics of education reform in Chicago from the 1960s to the present. I’ve always been […]

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Member of the Week: Claudio Daflon

Claudio Daflon @claudiodaflon Doctoral Candidate in History University of Connecticut  Describe your current research. What about it drew your interest?  My dissertation is about the expansion of the national university system towards the metropolitan municipalities of the Gran Buenos Aires. It questions how this process relates to the urbanization and transformation processes experienced in the […]

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Adding Fuel to the Right Fires

Today we are initiating our Scholar-Activist of the Month series. Nick Juravich, defended his dissertation in U.S. History at Columbia University on Monday, and in September he will be an Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the Center for Women’s History at the New-York Historical Society. Nick offers this reflection on the relationship between scholarship […]

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