Friends of SNCC and The Birth of The Movement

By Ethan Scott Barnett The Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) would have achieved little without their Friends. In 1960, lunch counter sit-ins and freedom rides placed SNCC in the national spotlight. By 1963, regional offices in Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and Washington, DC represented the organization’s growth and maturity. College students returning from Freedom Summer—a national […]

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Colonial Governance, Modernization, and the Process of Informalization in Accra

By Jennifer Hart The British colonial government moved their administration from Cape Coast to Accra in 1877 – a date which often marks the beginning of British consolidation of colonial rule in the Gold Coast. The motivations for the move were multiple. Protests over the imposition of new taxes and discontent over the abolition of […]

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Placing and Spacing the Dead in Colonial Accra

By Sarah Balakrishnan In present-day Kaneshie, in the centre of the sprawling seaside city of Accra, lies a cemetery known as Awudome. It is a massive plot of land. Once it had been the private estate of the mantse (chief) of Otublohum, gifted by the wulomo (priest) of Korle for acts of bravery during the […]

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An Obscure Afro-Brazilian “Colony” in Ghana: Accra’s Tabon Community

By Hermann W. von Hesse In the summer of 2017, I returned from Madison, Wisconsin to Accra – my hometown and Ghana’s capital since 1877 – to do my pre-dissertation research. Besides my main dissertation interests, I had since childhood been interested in the music and religion of Accra’s Afro-Brazilian descended community. Though not of […]

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The Metropole Bookshelf: Kara Schlichting on her new book, New York Recentered: Building the Metropolis from the Shore

The Metropole Bookshelf is an opportunity for authors of forthcoming or recently published books to let the UHA community know about their new work in the field. Kara M. Schlichting. New York Recentered: Building the Metropolis from the Shore. University of Chicago Press, 2019. By Kara M. Schlichting New York Recentered offers a new model […]

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Cityscape Number 4, November 19, 2019

Cityscape is The Metropole’s monthly shortcut to recent, forthcoming, or overlooked writing, exhibits and film. The City in Print A Place to Call Home: Immigrant Exclusion and Urban Belonging in New York, Paris, and Barcelona By Ernesto Castañeda. Stanford University Press, 2018. A study conducted over 14 years comparing the assimilation experience of African and […]

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Timothy Gilfoyle Discusses the New Oxford Encyclopedia of American Urban History

Editor’s note: In honor of Columbia historian Kenneth Jackson’s retirement, Columbia is holding a two-day conference called “An Urban World: The Changing Landscape of Suburbs and Cities.” Timothy Gilfoyle, interviewed here, will be among the numerous distinguished urban historians participating in the event. It is free and open to the public. See here for details. […]

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Whose Style? Taste, Class, and Power in Accra’s Architecture

By Kuukuwa Manful It is commonly thought that Accra, like many other African cities, has an architectural “identity crisis”[1] because “if you look at the city, there’s nothing that tells you where we were, where we’ve been, where we are, and where we’re going.”[2] This view, echoed in both academic and popular discourse, is held […]

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Member of the Week: Carl Nightingale

Carl Nightingale Professor of Urban History Department of Transnational Studies University at Buffalo Coordinator, Global Urban History Project Board Secretary, People United for Sustainable Housing, PUSH Buffalo. Describe your current research. What about it drew your interest?  While writing my book on segregation, I got interested the relationship between urban history and other forms of […]

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