“The Ladies . . . Want Action”: The Greater Little Rock Women’s Chamber of Commerce and the Crusade for Urban Renewal

In our fifth installment of the 2019 UHA/The Metropole Grad Student Blog contest,  University of Mississippi PhD candidate Monica N. Campbell explores the role of white women in pushing through urban renewal and slum clearance, advancing the “life cycle” of their cities. Through her essay, Campbell suggests that historical tropes about urban renewal, often seen as […]

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Member of the Week: Andrew Pope

Andrew Pope Lecturer in History & Literature Harvard University @popeand Describe your current research. What about it drew your interest? My current project, Living in the Struggle: Black Power, Gay Liberation, and Women’s Liberation Movements in Atlanta, 1964-1996, explores how poor and working class residents of Atlanta came to identify mutual interests across traditional lines […]

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Member of the Week: Hong Zhang

Hong Zhang Associate Professor of History University of Central Florida Describe your current research. What about it drew your interest?  My current research focuses largely on the history of Tianjin in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Located about 120 kilometers southeast of Beijing, Tianjin is one of the four centrally administered province-level municipalities […]

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Busting Out in WWII-Era Brooklyn

This piece by Emily Brooks is the first entrant into the Second Annual UHA/The Metropole Graduate Student Blogging Contest. We invited graduate students to submit essays on theme of “Striking Gold,” whether lucre or archival treasures. Brooks’ interpretation of the theme hews to the latter, and she uses a memo discovered on a reel of […]

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Lady Bird: Discussing Teen Angst, Class, and Early Aughts Sacramento

Like many collaborative digital projects, The Metropole is entirely assembled via remote correspondence; as co-editors, Ryan and I send daily emails between Washington, D.C. and Pittsburgh. In between editing submissions, we brainstorm future blog posts and trade banter about music, books, and movies. Ryan approaches pop culture with a typically Gen X cynicism, while I […]

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Member of the Week: Rebecca Scofield

Rebecca Scofield Assistant Professor of American History University of Idaho Describe your current research. What about it drew your interest?  I am currently completing my book project, tentatively titled Outriders: Rodeo at the Fringe of the American West, which investigates various marginalized rodeo communities over the course of the twentieth century. My project asks how […]

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Scholar-Activist of the Month: Catherine Fosl

Catherine Fosl, Ph.D. Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies and Director, Anne Braden Institute for Social Justice Research College of Arts & Sciences, University of Louisville  I entered the academy in the early 1990s after spending much of the 1980s working in journalism and community organizing.  About the same time I graduated from college in […]

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Au revoir New Orleans, Hola Mexico City

On February 3, 2013, New Orleans became the American capitol for the day while the city hosted Super Bowl XLVII. The 2013 Super Bowl is most remembered for two events unrelated to the football game: the blackout and the halftime show. Beyoncé Carter-Knowles headlined, garnering praise for her performance of hits like “Run the World […]

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Member of the Week: Kenvi Phillips

Kenvi Phillips, PhD Schlesinger Library at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University Describe your current research. What about it drew your interest? Among the topics I am currently interested in is the Colored Y Campaign lead by Rev. Jesse E. Moorland in the early 20th century. The efforts of the national and […]

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