Seattle History, Gay Activism, and the Future of LGBTQI Scholarship

In many ways, 1977 represented a great deal of possibility for Seattle’s LGBTQ community. Granted in years prior, the Gay Community Center on Renton Hill had been bombed and Robert Sirico’s gay Metropolitan Community Church faced possible closure, yet on July 1, 1976 the state’s anti-sodomy law was repealed and the Seattle City Council had […]

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Member of the Week: Claudio Daflon

Claudio Daflon @claudiodaflon Doctoral Candidate in History University of Connecticut  Describe your current research. What about it drew your interest?  My dissertation is about the expansion of the national university system towards the metropolitan municipalities of the Gran Buenos Aires. It questions how this process relates to the urbanization and transformation processes experienced in the […]

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Poisoners, Policemen, and a Scandal in the Court of King Louis XIV: Exploring the Origins of Parisian Policing with Holly Tucker

Although Professor Holly Tucker wrote her new book for a non-academic audience, City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic, and the First Police Chief of Paris begins with a scene uniquely suited to evoke terror and handwringing from historians. The preface, which Tucker entitles “Burn Notice,” is set in the palace of Versailles in […]

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Reckoning with Seattle: Race, Class, and Community in the Emerald City

The historiography of Seattle evades simple classification. Urban historians might ask, why Seattle? What does the city’s history contribute to our understanding of urban planning, housing policy, and the urgent questions surrounding race and policing? Where to locate Seattle within regional and cartographic taxonomies, and their attendant historiographies, is similarly fraught. Indeed Seattle features prominently […]

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UHA Statement in Support of Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor

The Urban History Association strongly condemns the ugly harassment that has been directed against Princeton University professor Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor. We stand with Dr. Taylor, and most ardently support her right to speak uncensored and without threats or intimidation. An attack on any one member of our organization in this manner is a threat to all of […]

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Member of the Week: Carmen C. M. Tsui

Carmen C. M. Tsui, Ph.D. Assistant Professor Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering, City University of Hong Kong Describe your current research. What about it drew your interest?  Growing up in Hong Kong, I was always fascinated that such a tiny city can accommodate a population of 7 million people. Nevertheless, I have a fundamental […]

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A Bibliography for the Capital of the Pacific Northwest: Seattle

  Over the last quarter of a century, Seattle has gone from remote, grunge rock, alternative Pac NW paradise (as portrayed in the now 25 year old movie Singles) to environmental aggro bike riding hipster World Trade Organization protesting enclave (see 2007’s Battle in Seattle) to new Silicon Valley tech Amazon/Microsoft led metropolis. Its sibling […]

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Mexico City in the Journal of Urban History

To be frank, when compared our April Metropolis of the Month, New Orleans, the Journal of Urban History’s record of publication in regard to Mexico City is not as robust. During the 1990s, the JUH published articles on the city’s demographics in 1811, class and urban space in the Porfirian era, and an epic essay […]

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Scholar-Activist of the Month: Catherine Fosl

Catherine Fosl, Ph.D. Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies and Director, Anne Braden Institute for Social Justice Research College of Arts & Sciences, University of Louisville  I entered the academy in the early 1990s after spending much of the 1980s working in journalism and community organizing.  About the same time I graduated from college in […]

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