Digital Summer School: Digitizing the Robin Dunitz collection

Editor’s note: This is the fourth installment in our second annual Digital Summer School series which highlights digital humanities projects focused on urban history. University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee professor Chris Cantwell conducted our first class regarding the digital project Gathering Places, Religion and Community in Milwaukee. Trinity College historian Jack Dougherty led our second course discussing his work […]

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Member of the Week: Peter Laurence

Peter L. Laurence Associate Professor of Architecture Clemson University School of Architecture twitter.com/peterlaurence facebook.com/becomingjanejacobs Describe your current research. What about it drew your interest? Much of my research has been concerned with the presence (and absence) of urbanism in architectural theory and in architects’ thinking in general. This led me, more than twenty years ago, […]

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Member of the Week: Michael Glass

Michael Glass Ph.D. Candidate, Princeton University @m_r_glass Describe your current research. What about it drew your interest?  As a former New York City high school teacher, I’ve long been interested in educational inequality. For my M.A. thesis, I studied the 1950s school desegregation movement in Harlem, portions of which were recently published in the JUH. […]

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Teaching Immigration History after Tree of Life

This morning we are briefly departing from our usual coverage on The Metropole to reflect on the intersection of pedagogy and current events. In this post, co-editor Avigail Oren comments on her experience in the classroom following the attack at Tree of Life. On Monday, October 22, I began teaching a half-semester course at Carnegie Mellon […]

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Member of the Week: Erika Kitzmiller

Erika M. Kitzmiller Teachers College Columbia University Describe your current research. What about it drew your interest?  My scholarship examines the historical processes and current reform efforts that have contributed to and challenged inequalities in present-day urban spaces. My work leverages quantitative and qualitative data to understand the intersections of educational policy and the lives […]

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Cleveland, Carl Stokes, and Commemorating a Historic Election

By Avigail Oren On November 7, 1967, the citizens of Cleveland elected Carl B. Stokes mayor. Stokes became the first black mayor of a major American city, a considerable feat in a majority-white metropolis. During his two terms as mayor, from 1968-1972, Stokes represented all Clevelanders and sought to universally improve the city’s neighborhoods, while […]

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