The Rules of Disaster Relief on New Orleans’s Main Streets

By Fallon Samuels Aidoo Countless community economic development initiatives took place in New Orleans within a decade of Hurricane Katrina making landfall in August of 2005. Many foundation and charity funded organizations restored storm-damaged storefronts in high-income neighborhoods on high ground, where tourists, investors, and even city planners expected streetcars, shotguns, and short-term rentals to […]

Read More

Member of the Week: Kevin McQueeney

Kevin McQueeney PhD Candidate in History Georgetown University @KevMcQueeney Describe your current research. What about it drew your interest? I am currently finishing my dissertation, which examines the rise and perpetuation of the apartheid healthcare system, racial health disparity, and the black struggle for improved health and access to healthcare in New Orleans. I became […]

Read More

The South Isn’t Exceptional, the People Are: New Orleans and Prisoner Rights Activism

New Orleans, and the state of Louisiana more generally, are often held up as the worst examples of policing and criminal justice. It’s where the Angola 3 were incarcerated, alongside Zulu Whitmore, as political prisoners. It’s where Amnesty International has focused much of its anti-carceral state activism. Angola often gets held up as “a modern […]

Read More