Discrimination and Sanitation in a White City: Nairobi during British Colonial Rule

By Waseem-Ahmed Bin-Kasim Not long after the horrifying murder of George Floyd by a police officer in Minneapolis in May 2020, protesters took to the streets in cities across the United States and the rest of the world demanding justice and a redress of decades of police brutality, systemic racism, and inequality.  In London, Bristol, […]

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From Cold War Counterinsurgency to Policing in Ferguson: A Review of Stuart Schrader’s Badges Without Borders

Schrader, Stuart. Badges without Borders: How Global Counterinsurgency Transformed American Policing. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2019. By Charlotte Rosen As heavily-armed SWAT teams rained rubber bullets and tear gas on Ferguson protestors in August 2014, Palestinians on Twitter offered not only solidarity, but tactical advice. Given that the same tear gas […]

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Colonial Governance, Modernization, and the Process of Informalization in Accra

By Jennifer Hart The British colonial government moved their administration from Cape Coast to Accra in 1877 – a date which often marks the beginning of British consolidation of colonial rule in the Gold Coast. The motivations for the move were multiple. Protests over the imposition of new taxes and discontent over the abolition of […]

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Placing and Spacing the Dead in Colonial Accra

By Sarah Balakrishnan In present-day Kaneshie, in the centre of the sprawling seaside city of Accra, lies a cemetery known as Awudome. It is a massive plot of land. Once it had been the private estate of the mantse (chief) of Otublohum, gifted by the wulomo (priest) of Korle for acts of bravery during the […]

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Accra, an Archive of Mobility: A Bibliography of the West African Metropolis

Movement, both unfettered and brutally curtailed, has long been central to Accra’s urban culture. From its days as a slave entrepot, through its decades as a colonial possession, well into its car-driven post-independence boom years, Accra has always been defined by movement–of the enslaved, by colonial administrators, of goods, and of postcolonial citizens. Take for […]

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