ICYMI: The Happy 2nd Birthday, Global Urban History Blog Edition

Our internet bff, the Global Urban History Blog, just celebrated a major milestone! In recognition of their big birthday, they’re counting down their 10 most-read posts on Twitter: The 10 most read posts of the past year. 10: Neoliberalism and the Structure of Settler Colonialism in a North… https://t.co/ESGVxFSWqI pic.twitter.com/aarEOA213d — Global Urban History (@urbanhist) […]

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Planning Ahead for UHA 2018

We at The Metropole are still mourning the end of this last month’s excellent SACRPH conference, and so have eagerly begun to look ahead towards next year’s UHA Conference in Columbia, South Carolina. Jessica Elfenbein and Robin Waites of the Local Arrangements Committee and LaDale Winling and Elaine Lewinnik of the Program Committee assure us that […]

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26 Weeks of Insightful Advice

We at The Metropole recently realized that we have featured 26 Members of the Week since launching in April–half a year’s worth of spotlights on a diverse slice of the UHA’s membership. We have learned so much about the state of the field through these profiles, particularly what’s cutting edge in urban research and what […]

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Announcing our Judges!

The Metropole is holding a blog contest for the UHA’s graduate student members to provide an opportunity for emerging scholars to gain experience working through the editorial process. We are excited to announce the panel of expert judges who will choose our winner, who will recieve a $100 prize and a certificate of recognition: Judge […]

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Goodbye, Cleveland…

I have never been so sad to bid farewell to one of our Metropoles of the Month. Not only did the blog feature some incredible history and personal reflections on Believeland in October, but the SACRPH Conference this past weekend took the utmost advantage of #CLE and showcased everything the city has to offer. There […]

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Member of the Week: Tammy Ingram

Tammy Ingram Associate Professor of History College of Charleston @tammyingram Describe your current research. What about it drew your interest? I’m working on a new book that’s tentatively titled The Wickedest City in America: Sex, Race, and Organized Crime in the Jim Crow South. It’s about Phenix City, Alabama, a small city in the southern […]

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A History of Loss: My Three Decades of Cleveland Sports

By Adam Gallagher  One of my earliest memories is of my dad, a pretty even-keeled guy most of the time, punching through a toy drum of mine after what surely seemed to be the trough of his Cleveland fandom. It’s the winter of 1988, and the Cleveland Browns are facing the Denver Broncos for the […]

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“On the cusp of cool”?: The Problematic Nature of Rust Belt Narratives in Two New Histories on Cleveland

“[Cleveland, a city] of nearly 400,000 residents is where millennial boomerangs are returning and transplants are arriving, bringing with them big ideas,” Fran Golden wrote in the Los Angeles Times earlier this year.   “Count me among the most surprised to see amazing stuff happening in the Rust Belt.” For much of the late twentieth century, […]

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Member of the Week: Joe Merton

Joe Merton Department of History University of Nottingham         Describe your current research. What about it drew your interest? I’m currently working on a project which examines a perceived crisis of crime, particularly street crime, in 1960s and 1970s New York City, and its role in transforming the city’s politics, public policy […]

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Doing Urban History in Cleveland: A Personal Reflection

  By Todd Michney As for my earliest Cleveland memory, I am unsure, but riding the RTA’s Red Line Rapid Transit to the old Municipal Stadium for baseball games toward the end of the 1970s is one that certainly stands out. Initiated in 1928 when Cleveland still ranked as the country’s fifth-largest city, the facility […]

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